Crazy for God, by Frank Schaeffer

CrazyCrazy for God: How I Grew Up as One of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right, and Lived to Take All (or Almost All) of It Back, by Frank Schaeffer.

I was one of Frank Schaeffer’s father’s disciples (Francis Shaeffer wrote The God Who is There and a dozens of other books that energized 60s & 70s Christian college students).  Frank has had an interesting career, evolving from (as the title indicates) involvement in the first days of the religious right, to what now appears to be a nearly complete turnaround with respect to the religious right and its political alliances.

Here’s a C-Span program where he discusses the book, an appearance at Princeton, and here is his web page.

Amazon says:

From Publishers Weekly
Part autobiography, part parental tribute and part examination of how American evangelism got to where it is, versatile author Schaeffer tells a moving story of growing up and growing wise in his latest (after Baby Jack: A Novel). Raised in Switzerland in the utopian community and spiritual school his evangelical parents founded, Schaeffer was restless and aware even at a young age that “my life was being defined by my parent’s choices.” Still, he took to “the family business” well, following his dad as he became one of the “best-known evangelical leaders in the U.S.” on whirlwind speaking tours. While rubbing shoulders with such empire builders as Pat Robertson, James Dobson and Jerry Falwell, Schaeffer witnessed the birth of the Christian anti-abortion movement, and became an evangelical writer, speaker and star in his own right. His disillusionment, when it came, hit hard; while he would eventually achieve modest fame as a filmmaker and author (of novels and nonfiction), the initial stages of Schaeffer’s post-religious life were anything but glamorous; a particularly moving passage describes Schaeffer shoplifting pork chops rather than return to the evangelical fold. Schaeffer does not mince words, making his narrative honest, inflammatory and at times quite funny; despite its excess length and some confusing chronological leaps, this story of faith, fame and family in modern America is a worthy read.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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