Rethinking Aging

Rethinking Aging: Growing Old and Living Well in an Overtreated Society, by Nortin M. Hadler ($18.48)

Review

“Hadler advocates informed decision making pertaining to all stages of aging.”
Library Journal

“With this thoughtful guide, Hadler urges better options for end-of-life care than a lonely, traumatic last stop at the hospital.”
Publishers Weekly

“Nortin Hadler challenges much conventional wisdom about aging with insight and verve. You may not embrace all of his views, but you will agree that his approach is often original and always thought provoking.”
-Jerome Groopman, M.D., Recanati Professor, Harvard Medical School, Author of How Doctors Think

“Dr. Hadler has done an amazing job at engendering the debate on aging and medical care.”
-William J. Hall, Fine Professor of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine Center for Healthy Aging

“An unflinching and rational dissection of the anti-aging field from one of the most respected voices in the health care debate today. Like Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman, Dr. Hadler’s scalpel has an uncanny ability to separate facts from hype and make us reexamine every screening test and treatment we take for granted as effective.”
-P. Murali Doraiswamy, senior fellow, Duke Center for the Study of Aging, and coauthor, Living Well After An Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Product Description

For those fortunate enough to reside in the developed world, death before reaching a ripe old age is a tragedy, not a fact of life. Although aging and dying are not diseases, older Americans are subject to the most egregious marketing in the name of “successful aging” and “long life,” as if both are commodities. In Rethinking Aging, Nortin M. Hadler examines health-care choices offered to aging Americans and argues that too often the choices serve to profit the provider rather than benefit the recipient, leading to the medicalization of everyday ailments and blatant overtreatment. Rethinking Aging forewarns and arms readers with evidence-based insights that facilitate health-promoting decision making.

Over the past decade, Hadler has established himself as a leading voice among those who approach the menu of health-care choices with informed skepticism. Only the rigorous demonstration of efficacy is adequate reassurance of a treatment’s value, he argues; if it cannot be shown that a particular treatment will benefit the patient, one should proceed with caution. In Rethinking Aging, Hadler offers a doctor’s perspective on the medical literature as well as his long clinical experience to help readers assess their health-care options and make informed medical choices in the last decades of life. The challenges of aging and dying, he eloquently assures us, can be faced with sophistication, confidence, and grace.

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